Category Archives: Student Life

“Adulting” at HGSE

It’s 10 pm on a Tuesday night, and I’m standing close to the stage, eagerly awaiting Aquilo, one of my favorite bands for the past couple years now, to begin their act. I have two midterms and one major problem set all due in less than a week, but I push it out of my mind for the moment, knowing that the time for studies will come later. There’s so much more to Harvard than just academics, and The Sinclair, a venue less than a three-minute walk from the HGSE campus, has become part of my Harvard tradition.

Looking back at the past four months (having arrived in Cambridge back in June to begin a lab position), I’m struck by just how much like a kid I feel at heart, which is probably why I’m drawn to Education in the first place. There’s something strangely odd after being an adult in the “real world” for the last three years about throwing on a backpack every morning, heading to class, and pulling out my Curious George pencil case to retrieve my rainbow highlighters and sticky notes.

There’s something else, too, about having been in the “real world” that has changed the way I feel about academics now that I’m back in school again. Class now feels like a privilege, not like the duty that it once felt back in college. Choosing to come back to school – choosing to come to HGSE – has reinvigorated a sense of curiosity and wonder that I thought I had lost while working full-time. I’m enjoying life at HGSE so much that it feels more like a playground than a stereotypical school (which all education should be like, right?).

I’m finding myself engaging with academics in a new manner that is allowing me to truly understand my purpose in embarking on such a pedagogical journey. The material we learn in class feels tangibly animated. We’re not just learning concepts; we’re being challenged to engage our imaginations to envision using such theories in applied settings to truly incite meaningful change. Meetings with professors are not just matters of administrative duty but are brainstorming sessions that leave you inspired and empowered to apply yourself as a global solution. Homework assignments involve creating interventions that actually will be brought into the classroom. For me, academics have moved from a realm of duty to the sphere of energizing possibilities that makes me look forward to heading to the library every night.

And the motivation to practice my new skills has given me time and space to rediscover another “childlike” quality I thought I had lost – the desire to try everything. I do feel like a kid during my weekly Capoeira lessons – messing up my lefts and rights, struggling to remember the Portuguese vocabulary, singing with the rest of my class during roda. I’ve gone to my first professional soccer game, my first river cruise, and even my first PsyD campus visit. Last week, I even tried my first truly authentic, mouth-watering Chinese dinner, cooked from scratch by a friend’s mom, which necessitated a translator to keep the conversation flow over the meal. Long story short – there are a lot of firsts here at Harvard, inside and outside of the academic sphere.

If you do decide to come study at HGSE, which I hope you do, my best advice to you is embrace a childlike mindset; come here “tabula rasa” – ready to open your mind to all of the academic and non-academic opportunities that the university has to offer. Go to that weeknight concert. Sign for every listserv possible and actually go to the events. Say “yes” to joining that club, even if you don’t yet know how to properly say it’s name (like Capoeira = cap-o-ey-ra). HGSE will “grow you up” – a lot – in ways you never expected possible. Opening yourself up to such change through embracing a mindset of curiosity, wonder, and an interminable desire to try everything will help you cultivate a healthy sense of humility for such learning. In order to learn how to change the world, one must first learn how to change one’s self; I have broken my preconceptions of age and have discovered that one can “adult” without having to let go of what truly matters.

Written by Arianna RiccioHeadshot

Arianna Riccio is a current Ed.M. candidate in the Human Development & Psychology program at HGSE who aspires to pursue doctoral studies after graduation. She received a BA in French (Psychology minor) from Franklin & Marshall College in 2014 and spent the past year serving as an AmeriCorps*VISTA for the Boys & Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation in northwest Montana. Arianna’s hobbies include yoga, meditation, writing, and having spontaneous discussions about the meaning of life.

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Welcome to campus: A tale of 3 buildings

The first week at HGSE was a blur of stimulating presentations, free food, and lots of new faces. As overwhelming as it could have been, I noticed right away that it was all grounded in a spirit of connection and building community. One common message students heard from faculty and staff was, “Reach out. This is your community.” They didn’t just say it—they showed it too. Every professor I met smiled and introduced themselves, eager to hear about my past experiences and interests. Every staff member—from the library to the Career Services Office—pointed me towards helpful resources and went above and beyond to answer my questions, hear my story, and ask follow up questions.

As any urban design student will tell you, space impacts experience. The fact that the HGSE campus is fully contained on one quiet, tree-lined street probably impacts the intimate, welcoming experience that I have had so far. For prospective students who haven’t visited Appian Way, I want to take you on a tour through the three main buildings on the HGSE campus.

Monroe C. Gutman Library, affectionately called “Gutman

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Gutman Library on a sunny day in October

If the HGSE campus was a human body, Gutman would be the heart. This is the building that many students, faculty, and staff find themselves gravitating towards first thing in the morning, between classes, before student clubs, and to grab a cup of coffee. The Commons cafe offers delicious, affordable food and there’s something for everyone: sushi, soup, pizza, sandwiches, salads, and hot entrees everyday plus coffee and baked goods to keep you going through moments of exhaustion. The Office of Student Affairs is situated on the first floor and they can answer most student questions or at least point you in the right direction. Gutman is also the HGSE library and has a diverse range of resources and study spaces, including outdoor patios, quiet communal spaces, group study spaces, and even a fireplace. If you visit HGSE, make sure you try the chocolate chip cookies at the The Commons. You will not be disappointed!

Larsen Hall

 

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Professor Tivnan in a typical lecture hall in Larsen

Larsen Hall houses classrooms and faculty offices. I have a Research Methods lecture in Larsen Hall room G08. The room makes it easy to pay attention—there is a surround-sound audio system and multiple screens so there isn’t a bad seat in the room. The built-in, wrap-around desks offer tons of electrical outlets so I can charge my electronics during class. Multi-tasking win!

Longfellow Hall

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One of the entrances to Longfellow Hall

Longfellow Hall is home to many student service offices: the Admissions Office, the Financial Services Office, and the Career Services Office. It’s also home to Askwith Hall, a beautiful, historic lecture hall that hosts the Askwith Forums and several large lecture classes.  In my first month at HGSE I have attending several events in Askwith Hall; “Education and Transformative Justice: How is September 11 Significant,” hosted by the Office of Student Affairs and “HGSE 4 Help: A Benefit Performance for Disaster Relief,” hosted by HGSE students.

Post and photos by Cecelia DeKorne

Cecelia DeKorne is an Ed.M. candidate in the Human Development and Psychology program and is interested in how adult development principles can be used to improve organizational culture. Cecelia is excited for the year ahead and plans to explore the many libraries on campus, learn as much as she can about organizational psychology, and try every type of cookie at The Commons!

Cecelia is a Graduate Assistant at the HGSE Admissions office and will be posting throughout the 2017-2018 school year. 

The Job Search

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With just over a month left before graduation, landing a dream job is high on many HGSE students’ priority lists. I’m still working on defining exactly what a “dream job” looks like to me, but luckily I have plenty of resources here to help me figure it out.

The HGSE Career Services Office (CSO) is your main source for support, and is available to students starting Day 1 and remains accessible after graduation. I’ve had multiple one-on-one meetings with career services counselors, and these meetings have been great for clarifying my goals, narrowing the scope of my search and updating my resume. I’ve also attended a few career services workshops. One helpful workshop I attended last month dealt with salary negotiations. The workshop gave tips on how to calculate your target salary and how to sell yourself to get your number. The workshop also touched on how to negotiate other aspects of job offers like flexible schedules, adjusted responsibilities, and job titles. A great perk about CSO is that they will see you within 48 hours if you have a job offer to help you strategize with salary negotiations.

In addition to offering individual meetings and group workshops, career services also holds several job fairs. Two recent examples are the Social Impact Expo, with nonprofit and mission driven employers, and the Education PreK-12 Expo, with charter, private, public and nonprofit schools. I’ve also attended job fairs at other graduate schools on campus, like the Harvard Kennedy School’s Urban Innovations Employer Connections Event. These events are a great way to get an idea of the types of jobs available and network with employers.

As a HGSE student and alum, you have access to Hired which is a job database with a wealth of career opportunities across the country and internationally. Start looking at this as soon as you can. You also have access to a huge network of alumni, professors and classmates with connections in the field. HGSE graduates are all over the world, and being a part of that network of leaders and change agents is valuable not only for your initial job search, but for the rest of your sure-to-be-amazing career!

Sara DeWolf is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Education Policy and Management program. She has experience as both a civil litigation attorney and a public school teacher. When she’s not at HGSE, you can find her playing with her daughters and exploring Boston.

A Day in the Life of a Spring Semester TEP Student

Hi everyone! Spring semester of the Teacher Education Program (TEP) looks very different than a lot of other Ed.M. programs at HGSE. That’s because we are completing full-time teaching practicums for our Massachusetts teaching certification. Here’s what a typical Monday is like for me:

5:20 a.m. – Alarm goes off. Yikes. I hit snooze a bunch of times before eventually rolling out of bed to start my day.

6:15-7:00 a.m. – Commute to my school site. I live kind of far and take the train (MBTA), but I actually don’t mind the long commute at all. I consider my mornings as an important built in time for self-care. I listen to music, drink my coffee, and get mentally ready for the day.  Plus, I get to see this stellar view every day:

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Sunrise view of the Boston skyline from Charlestown, MA

7:15 a.m. – School starts! I work in a middle school that has an advisory period every morning. This spring, I am running a book club two days a week during this time for students who need an additional challenge. Every TEP student is required to take on an “additional responsibility” outside of teaching during practicum, so this is mine.

8:15 a.m. – 2:25 p.m. – The rest of school. My mentor teacher and I co-teach four sections of 6th grade ELA. This spring, two of the classes have become my primary responsibility. Between teaching, IEP and team meetings, and a planning period, the day always goes by super fast!

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My 6th Grade Classroom!

3:15 p.m. – Arrive at HGSE. Grab a quick snack in Gutman Café. (Gutman chocolate chip cookies are the best afternoon snack on busy days! Seriously – get one. You won’t regret it.) Chat with some friends, catch up on emails, and prepare for my 4:00 class.

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Outside Gutman Library

4:00 – 7:00 p.m. – Time for class. Since TEP students start earlier than the rest of the Master’s programs, we technically aren’t required to take courses at HGSE during our spring practicum. But many of us still do since there are so many good classes to choose from. This semester, I’m taking Educating to Transform Society: Preparing Students to Disrupt and Dismantle Racism with Dr. Aaliyah El-Amin. It’s been one of the most powerful classes I’ve taken this year.

7:30 – Finally home! I make dinner, do some last minute review of the next day’s lessons, and occasionally watch some mindless reality TV with my roommates (looking at you The Bachelor…sorry/not sorry).

10:00 – Lights out. Time to sleep and do it all again tomorrow.

Sarah Mintz is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Teacher Education Program, pursuing licensure as a middle school English teacher. She comes to HGSE from Washington, D.C., where she worked at an independent school and a non-profit serving incarcerated youth. Outside of education, she loves to spend her time cooking and exploring the city with friends

The 15th Annual Alumni of Color Conference

On March 2-4, I had the honor of chairing the 15th Annual Alumni of Color Conference (AOCC) with the theme Define. Defy. Dismantle: Forging Our Legacy Through Activism. It was hands down the most rewarding experience for me as a student at HGSE. Five months of planning came together for a weekend filled with social activism. We had over 700 registered participants which consisted of students, faculty, staff, alumni, youth, scholars, and citizens from across the country. We had 7 keynote speakers, a special guest, and about 45 workshops over the course of six breakout sessions.

As a Tri-Chair, I was tasked with turning an idea into a full 3 day conference. Before this year, the largest event I planned was a male scholarship pageant through my sorority (Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.) in undergrad. I had never planned a conference before and was honestly unaware of all it would take to successfully execute this conference. I quickly found out the amount of work, dedication, and sacrifice it would take and I am truly appreciative of the phenomenal leadership team that helped make this conference possible.

On Thursday, March 2, Dr. Peter T. Keo provided a kickoff for the conference. He gave a speech that energized participants and excited the crowd about what was to come over the course of the weekend. Many participants commented on the appreciation of hearing a man of Asian descent speak about dismantling racism from a perspective that is often not highlighted.

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Dr. Keo with the Tri-Chairs (from left to right: Kimberly Osagie, Rashaida Melvin, Alfatah Moore)

Friday, there were three breakout sessions and an Askwith Forum. The Askwith forum titled “Take Action: Advancing Justice and Equity in Today’s Climate” was composed of keynote speakers Dr. Arshad I. Ali, Ed.M.’04, Assemblyman Michael A. Blake, Albino Garcia, Jr., and Simran Noor with Christina “V” Villarreal, Ed.M.’05 moderating the panel. We also gave the Courage Award to the Denver Broncos’ linebacker Brandon Marshall for having the strength to fight for justice in regards to police brutality.

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From left to right: Christina “V” Villarreal, Assemblyman Michael Blake, Albino Garcia, Simran Noor, and Dr. Arshad Ali.

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Brandon Marshall with the AOCC Tri-Chairs

For a full video of the Askwith Forum, check out the live video on the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Facebook page from March 3rd. Also, check out this article I am featured in about the conference and specifically the Askwith Forum.
On Saturday, we had three more breakout sessions, a conversation with Brandon Marshall, granted three awards, and welcomed two additional keynote speakers: Dr. Rhonda Williams and Dr. Bettina Love. All of the speakers were phenomenal. Dr. Williams used spoken word to defy systems of oppression and Dr. Love discussed her curriculum on hip-hop education and fired up the crowd as she provided ways to dismantle oppression in education. I am beyond proud of the final product of AOCC 2017. It will be my greatest memory and experience at HGSE.

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Dr. Rhonda Williams, keynote speaker.

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Myself and Dr. Bettina Love (Fun Fact: Dr. Love is a professor at the same university I attended for my bachelor’s degree, The University of Georgia!)

I would love to help recruit the next Master’s Tri-Chair for AOCC 2018! I can give you the ins and outs of the planning process. I had to make sacrifices and give up a lot of free time because of this conference, but it was the BEST decision I made as a student here at HGSE.   

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AOCC Tri-Chairs with Tracie Jones from the Office of Student Affairs

Rashaida Melvin is a Master’s of Education candidate in the School Leadership Program. She has taught for three years and is excited about moving from the classroom into leadership. Rashaida is looking forward to serving both teachers and students in the future.

Community Building with “The Bachelor”

As you might imagine, Harvard is a place filled with really intelligent and driven people. Most times I can feel my IQ increasing just from walking around campus and taking in bits of conversation as I go. I’m grateful for the wealth of knowledge and expertise that exists in the people I get to interact with everyday—it’s a major reason why I chose to attend HGSE. Still, remembering that these very brilliant people are also just regular people, with regular-people interests, is such a comfort. I’m reminded this every Monday night, when a group of us Harvard students meet to watch The Bachelor.

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Being someone who has avoided the entire Bachelor franchise prior to this current season, I have to admit that when my friends Kathryn (HDP ‘17) and Manya (PSP ‘17) invited me to watch, I scoffed at the idea. Though, because they’d be watching the show in the TV room of our dorm, the Cronkhite Center, I figured there was no harm in moseying down to the basement for two hours of levity.

I was surprised to see a solid group of people in the room that first Monday night, and as the weeks progressed—and the number of roses being given lessened—our Bachelor-watching posse grew. Students from across the Harvard graduate schools were convening around our TV to see what Corinne said or did and make predictions about who Nick would and wouldn’t end up with. And I, who was at first a hostile viewer, found myself (gasp!) looking forward to these Monday night gatherings—partially for the show, which is both entertaining and ridiculous, but mostly for the community.

While this season and semester are drawing to a close, I realize that I’m really going to miss Monday night community-building with The Bachelor. On the bright side, however, the next season of The Bachelorette is right around the corner and I will almost certainly be watching.

Monique Hall is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Technology, Innovation, and Education program. She is passionate about children’s media, ice cream, and educational equity.

 

True Life: I’m a Graduate Student at Harvard

My Monday Schedule:

7:45 am: Wake up, get ready for class

8:30 am: Leave the house and walk to HGSE

9:00 am-12:00 pm: Attend class

12:00-12:30 pm: Meet with my fellow Tri-Chairs about the Alumni of Color Conference

12:30-4:00 pm: Eat lunch, prepare for class, attend office hours, chat with friends

4:00-7:00 pm: Attend class

7:30 pm-1:00 am: Eat dinner, prepare to go to my internship the next day, complete assignments, read for class, job search, talk to family, self-care

This is a typical Monday schedule for me. I would consider this to be a calm day. One in which I do not have very many meetings and everything goes as planned. Of course, that rarely happens. During my time here at HGSE, I have been challenged beyond what I thought was possible. I have taken on many responsibilities and tasks that, at many times, make me feel as if I am being pulled in every direction. But I like this! There are so many opportunities and I am trying to take advantage of as many as possible.

Q: What do you like best about being a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education?

A: I like being surrounded by the community members at HGSE. Everyday I am learning from and with people who have done amazing things in their lives and careers. I love how humble everyone is about their accomplishments. I could be sitting next to someone who has started multiple businesses or who raises money to support kids internationally, and would never know it because people at the Ed school aren’t about competing with each other. We all just want to do what is best for kids!

Q: What is most challenging about being at HGSE?

A: Trying to do everything I possibly can in one year – and do it all well. I can honestly say that I have tried to take as much as possible from HGSE. Everyday I ask myself, “How can I take more from this experience?” I push myself to think beyond the classroom. The classroom is great, but there are so many other things to take from HGSE that is outside the classroom, and outside of HGSE as well.

Q: Did you feel prepared to come to HGSE?

A: After coming here and realizing how strategic people were in the things they wanted to see and do, I realized that I was not prepared. I was trying to figure things out as I went. Other people who knew exactly which professors they wanted to learn from, which organizations they wanted to be a member of, and how they wanted to impact the HGSE community. I didn’t. I just knew that I wanted to come here and make a name for myself and do something that would make HGSE and myself proud. That was my goal. Of course, I wanted to expand my network and learn from amazing people. But I knew I would only feel that I conquered this experience if I left a lasting mark on this school. Do I think I have positioned myself to do this? I am proud to say yes. Absolutely!

Q: Looking back, what might you have done before coming to HGSE to be more prepared?

A: If I could go back to last summer, I would have used my time more wisely. I would have actually planned out all of the opportunities I wanted to explore as well as the tangible deliverables of my time here. I feel as if there are resources that I am just now tapping into that would have been amazing to experience back in September or October. I then remind myself that it is impossible to do everything and that I have taken on a lot of responsibilities. I know that everything is working out in perfect timing and exactly as it should be. I take comfort in this. I realize that I am only one person and I cannot do everything, even though I try.

Q: What have you learned at HGSE that you will use beyond Appian Way?

A: I’ve learned so much! There is plenty to learn in the classroom and through internships. But what I have learned the most beyond that is about building my brand. Soon I will have this degree and will be back into the work to change the world. How am I going to use my knowledge to help others? How am I going to make a name for myself as a leader in education? These are things that I have learned outside the classroom through conversations with colleagues and friends. This is my focus as I progress through the semester and to graduation. At this moment in my program, I have realized that all of the work I have done here is great, but I have to keep working. I have to keep striving. I have to keep pressing.

Rashaida Melvin is a Master’s of Education candidate in the School Leadership Program. She has taught for three years and is excited about moving from the classroom into leadership. Rashaida is looking forward to serving both teachers and students in the future.

Soak it All Up

The realization of how little time I have left at HGSE hit me hard at the beginning of second semester. I have learned so much here, and there is so much more I want to soak up before I graduate. Luckily, there is no shortage of fantastic speakers and events. Here is a glimpse at some of the education leaders I’ve had a chance to learn from over the past few weeks.

At the beginning of the month, I attended a lecture series with Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, a distinguished professor at HGSE who is the first African-American woman in Harvard’s history to have an endowed professorship named in her honor. The series focused on three of Dr. Lawrence-Lightfoot’s books, and examined the relationships parents have with their children and with their children’s teachers. Having played all three roles of teacher, parent and child myself, I was intensely interested in the subject matter. I was also both moved and inspired by Dr. Lawrence-Lightfoot’s storytelling abilities. The series was a great opportunity to learn from a professor I may not have been exposed to otherwise.

Last week, I got three chances to glean some wisdom from Kaya Henderson, the former Chancellor of DC Public Schools who made amazing gains in the district during her tenure. First, we had an Education Policy and Management cohort meeting with her that was set up as a “fireside chat.” The day after the cohort meeting, I attended an Askwith Forum featuring Dr. Henderson called Driving Change: Challenges Superintendents Face in Urban Schools. Askwith forums are public lectures put on by HGSE that feature a wide range of topics and often include panels or interviews with prominent leaders in the education field. This Askwith panel also included two other well-known successful district leaders, Tom Boasberg, Superintendent of Denver Public Schools, and Tommy Chang, Superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Then I got a final chance to learn from Kaya Henderson when she attended my Politics and Education Change class.

Kaya Henderson is just the tip of the iceberg with speakers I have been exposed to through my Politics and Education change class, taught by Chris Gabrieli. Other class speakers over the past few weeks have included John King, former U.S. Secretary of Education, Josh Delaney (EPM ’14), education policy advisor for Senator Elizabeth Warren, Charles Barone, policy director for Democrats for Education Reform, and Neerav Kingsland, former CEO for New Schools for New Orleans.

These are really just a small fraction of the events and lectures I could have attended this month – HGSE and the other graduate schools at Harvard have a never-ending stream of influential people lined up to speak to students. The hard part is choosing what to attend with a limited amount of hours in the day. In the few months I have left, hopefully I’ll be able to attend as many events and soak up as much wisdom as I can!

Sara DeWolf is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Education Policy and Management program. She has experience as both a civil litigation attorney and a public school teacher. When she’s not at HGSE, you can find her playing with her daughters and exploring Boston.

 

A Southerner Meets New England Winter

We recently had a big snowstorm—I know, surprise! So far, winter hasn’t been too bad this year, but it definitely showed up that day. I actually had a day off from classes, and a day off from my internship (yay for snow days!). Originally, I’m from Dallas, Texas, and while it snows gently on rare occasions, Texans and snowstorms just aren’t friends. To give you some context, see a weather comparison between Dallas and Boston below (yikes).

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Dallas, TX weather is on the top and Cambridge, MA weather is below.

Although coming from the south to winter in Boston is a big change, there are ways to be prepared and make the most out of a snow day!

First, winter supplies:

  1. Make sure you have a heavy coat—one with a real hood, down, insulation, and long. You may think you can get away with a cute light jacket that stops at your hips, but you shouldn’t try it.
  1. Boots! Not those cute fall booties, but actual boots with traction that are waterproof and higher than the ankle. When my foot was sinking into snow banks, I was grateful for my heavy-duty boots.
  1. Boot socks—invest in some thick boot socks for days when its really cold or you plan on being outside for a while (I have Cabin Socks from Cabela’s)
  1. Scarves, hats, gloves—warm ones, and I recommend gloves with touchscreen capability so that you can still change your music, use GPS, and answer phone calls without taking them off

And… how to make the most of a Cambridge/Boston snow day!

  • Get groceries before the storm—you don’t have to go crazy, but make sure you don’t have to get out to go get milk in whiteout conditions (speaking from experience—whoops)
  • A Burdick’s hot chocolate mix
  • Candles in festive scents like “Sweater Weather”
  • Netflix
  • Get ahead on assignments and reading
  • Get together with friends to play in the snow, or join the citywide snowball fight in Boston Commons (it really happened, and it was awesome)

All in all, I had fun in the snow, and snowy winters aren’t that bad if you come prepared.  I also took some awesome pictures while I was out playing in the snow!

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Kaci McClure is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Language and Literacy program. Her primary passions are increasing literacy skills among high school students; addressing inequity in low-income, largely minority schools; and culturally responsive teaching. A transplant out of Louisiana who originally hails from Texas, Kaci has an affinity for sweet tea, spicy food, and the word “y’all.” She’s also an avid supporter of conscious rap and frybread, neither correlated to the other but both very powerful.  

Field Experience of Dreams

Is it too early to say that I love my Spring internship? Because it’s been all of one week since I’ve started my field experience position as an intern at WGBH and I am pretty much enamored.

As someone who aspires to create enjoyable educational media for children, the prospect of interning at WGBH was on my “List of Hopeful Grad School Experiences” before I even set foot on HGSE’s campus. WGBH is where so much of the educational programming I loved as a kid—like Arthur, ZOOM, and Between the Lions—was produced, so when I saw an opening for an intern in WGBH’s Digital Kids Production team, I immediately jumped at the chance.

In my first week, I’ve already had the opportunity to meet amazing people (including a few HGSE alums) who share my passion for media-based learning and I’ve been able to start some of the projects I’ll be working on over the length of my time at WGBH. I’m looking forward to a semester of learning about the overall digital production process and contributing to that process to make fun, high-quality media.

It’s been said that first impressions are lasting impressions and if my first week at WGBH is at all representative of the next 3.5 months, I think this internship will be a very meaningful part of my year at Harvard.

Monique Hall is a Master’s of Education candidate in the Technology, Innovation, and Education program. She is passionate about children’s media, ice cream, and educational equity.